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SPACE - random thread about space stuff

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Re: SPACE - random thread about space stuff

Post by Isgrimnur » Thu Jan 03, 2019 11:51 am

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Re: SPACE - random thread about space stuff

Post by Paingod » Thu Jan 03, 2019 12:13 pm

That planet needs a sammich and some dust clouds. It's looking a little too thin.
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Re: SPACE - random thread about space stuff

Post by Isgrimnur » Thu Jan 03, 2019 12:21 pm

Kraken wrote:
Thu Jan 03, 2019 12:07 am
Also, OSIRIS-ReX slipped into orbit around Bennu, which is only news because it's really hard to orbit a body that has basically no gravity.
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Re: SPACE - random thread about space stuff

Post by Moliere » Thu Jan 03, 2019 8:35 pm

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Re: SPACE - random thread about space stuff

Post by Isgrimnur » Wed Jan 09, 2019 5:18 pm

Hubble trouble
A hardware problem has put the main camera onboard the Hubble Space Telescope out of operation, according to a brief statement released by NASA today (Jan. 9).

The issue with the Wide Field Camera 3 occured on Jan. 8 at 12:23 p.m. EST (1723 GMT), according to the statement. NASA did not provide any details about the glitch itself beyond saying that it was caused by a hardware problem and that the camera carries redundant electronics that could be used to get the instrument running again.

It's not clear how long it will take to address the malfunction. It comes as NASA, like other agencies of the federal government, is partially shut down, and has been since Dec. 22, because Congress and President Donald Trump have failed to agree on a budget.
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Re: SPACE - random thread about space stuff

Post by Max Peck » Mon Jan 14, 2019 9:27 am

Astronomers Glimpse a Luminous Object Born From a Star’s Death
“It was very clear that it was not a normal supernova,” says Raffaella Margutti, an astrophysicist at Northwestern University, one of the many scientists who followed the mystery object, known as AT2018cow.

The alleged supernova was dozens of times brighter than any supernova on record. It reached its peak luminosity in two days and faded after 16 days. This, on the vast timescales of the universe, is extremely fast—faster than astronomers had ever seen.

According to current understanding in astronomy, this scenario should not be possible. The brightest supernovae usually come from the deaths of the biggest stars. These are slow affairs: The more material a dying star expels, the longer it takes for the afterglow of the explosion to reach its peak radiance. How could the mystery explosion flare so brightly and fade so quickly?

“It’s weird to see something that’s bright and evolving fast,” explains Iair Arcavi, an astronomer at Las Cumbres Observatory, a global network of ground-based telescopes. “It’s kind of a contradiction.”

When astronomers took a closer look at telescope data, they saw an unusual excess of X-rays. “Our first reaction, when we got that data, was maybe we made some mistake, because we’ve never seen that,” Margutti said. It meant that, deep in the core of the explosion, there was a source of X-rays so persistent that it would shine through the material surrounding it.

That gave the astronomers a clue about what they could be looking at. Almost all massive stars are thought to produce new astrophysical objects when they die— either a black hole or a neutron star. Black holes are invisible maws that gobble any material—gas, dust, entire stars—that comes near. Neutron stars are fast-spinning cores of tightly packed neutrons, the stripped-down versions of their progenitors. Both are extremely dense objects capable of violently whisking surrounding material. Margutti and her colleagues suspect that, in this case, those effects were enough to produce an unusually radiant light show.

The telescope, they’ve concluded, had captured the creation of a brand-new astrophysical object, either a black hole or a neutron star, for the first time.
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Re: SPACE - random thread about space stuff

Post by Daehawk » Mon Jan 14, 2019 9:35 am

I wish more than other objects they could retrieve Hubble and bring it home to a museum. We can put stuff up there but cant get it back safely still.
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Re: SPACE - random thread about space stuff

Post by Kraken » Mon Jan 14, 2019 11:54 am

Daehawk wrote:
Mon Jan 14, 2019 9:35 am
I wish more than other objects they could retrieve Hubble and bring it home to a museum. We can put stuff up there but cant get it back safely still.
There is some speculation that the SpaceX Dragon capsule could reach Hubble and repair/maintain it indefinitely. Nothing official yet, but it is being discussed.

Meanwhile, NASA can't try to revive it due to the government shutdown.

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Re: SPACE - random thread about space stuff

Post by Kraken » Tue Jan 15, 2019 7:14 pm

Apparently steam-powered spacecraft are a thing. Sort of. Potentially.

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Re: SPACE - random thread about space stuff

Post by Daehawk » Tue Jan 15, 2019 7:20 pm

Dont forget the huge Super Blood Wolf Moon eclipse this Sunday.

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Re: SPACE - random thread about space stuff

Post by Daehawk » Sat Jan 19, 2019 5:17 pm

Dont forget that blood moon tomorrow night...Super Wolf Blood Moon total lunar eclipse.

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Speaking of the moon. Here is a pic of the Earth and our Moon from 71 million miles away. Imagine if scientist in the 1500s could see this stuff.

http://digg.com/2019/earth-moon-bennu-photo

The Earth and Moon are the tiny little objects right together at bottom left. The big one top right is asteroid Bennu.

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Re: SPACE - random thread about space stuff

Post by Holman » Sat Jan 19, 2019 10:14 pm

I walk the dog every morning before sunrise, and lately I've been treated to a pairing of Venus and Jupiter in the SE sky, both of them brighter than anything else I can see. It's kind of stunning to imagine the distances involved even just with local planets.
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Re: SPACE - random thread about space stuff

Post by Jaymann » Sun Jan 20, 2019 1:20 am

Holman wrote:
Sat Jan 19, 2019 10:14 pm
I walk the dog every morning before sunrise, and lately I've been treated to a pairing of Venus and Jupiter in the SE sky, both of them brighter than anything else I can see. It's kind of stunning to imagine the distances involved even just with local planets.
I saw those this morning (rain washed away the So Cal haze), knew one of them had to be Venus. So Jupiter.
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Re: SPACE - random thread about space stuff

Post by Daehawk » Sun Jan 20, 2019 7:52 pm

The moon boss! The moon!
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Re: SPACE - random thread about space stuff

Post by Daehawk » Wed Jan 23, 2019 6:28 pm

Hope someone saw it. When I went out the eclipse was almost full and the moon was like a tree topper star all light and dazzle.

BTW a meteor seems to have struck it while it all went on.

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Re: SPACE - random thread about space stuff

Post by Isgrimnur » Wed Jan 23, 2019 6:36 pm

Fortune
The European Space Agency hopes to be mining the moon for water and oxygen in six years’ time.

The agency took a big step toward this ambition by signing a deal with launch provider ArianeGroup on Monday. The one-year contract will see the company examine the possibility of mining regolith — lunar soil and rock fragments that can yield oxygen and water, which could be very handy if you’re trying to put a base on the moon.

The mission would use an Ariane 64 launch vehicle. The European Space Agency (ESA) has already directed ArianeGroup, a joint venture between Airbus and Safran, to develop the craft, and its first test flight is anticipated in 2020.

As for the lunar lander, that would come from the German startup PTScientists (which entertainingly stands for “Part-Time Scientists”) — the same outfit that aims to put the first mobile network on the moon.

Europe is of course not the only place looking to the moon for mining opportunities. China and India are also keen on extracting a kind of nuclear fuel called helium-3, which could be useful for providing safer nuclear energy, and potentially for powering future spacecraft.
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Re: SPACE - random thread about space stuff

Post by Isgrimnur » Thu Jan 24, 2019 10:40 am

Discover
A rocket blasted off from Japan on Friday, Jan. 18, carrying satellites that will deliver the first-ever artificial meteor shower.

The Tokyo-based start-up ALE Co. Ltd has developed a new micro-satellite that will put on quite a show over Hiroshima early next year. Each satellite carries tiny balls with a secret chemical makeup. Once rocketed away from Earth, the satellite will release these balls, which will glow as they whiz through the atmosphere, simulating the appearance of a meteor shower.

These balls are designed to glow bright enough to be seen even over light-polluted cities, according to reporting by science news site phys.org. Each glow-ball, or “star,” is expected to shine for a few seconds before they completely burn up. There is no risk of the balls falling low enough to cause any issues on Earth. ALE hopes that eventually, they will be able to provide the public with a “shooting stars on demand” service — the projected price of this service is not yet known.
...
The rocket released the satellite 310 miles (500 km) above the planet, but the satellite will naturally and gradually descend to 249 miles (400 km) throughout its orbit this year. Each of these microsatellites carries 400 of the mysterious glow-balls. Satellites will release up to 20 of these balls during each “meteor shower” event, so each microsatellite would be capable of putting on 20 to 30 events, the start-up says. According to the statement, ALE hopes to put on the first of these artificial meteor showers in the spring of 2020, with more to come, including plans for a second launch later this year.

Hiroshima was chosen for the viewing site of the inaugural artificial meteor shower because of its good weather, the topographical landscape, and its culture, ALE CEO Lena Okajima said. If the sky is clear for the event, millions of people in Hiroshima could witness the world’s first artificial meteor shower.
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Re: SPACE - random thread about space stuff

Post by AWS260 » Thu Jan 24, 2019 6:41 pm

A closer look. Someone in the Twitter thread referred to it as "the hardest camera shot in human history."


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Re: SPACE - random thread about space stuff

Post by Holman » Thu Jan 24, 2019 7:22 pm

Isgrimnur wrote:
Thu Jan 24, 2019 10:40 am
Discover
A rocket blasted off from Japan on Friday, Jan. 18, carrying satellites that will deliver the first-ever artificial meteor shower.

The Tokyo-based start-up ALE Co. Ltd has developed a new micro-satellite that will put on quite a show over Hiroshima early next year. Each satellite carries tiny balls with a secret chemical makeup. Once rocketed away from Earth, the satellite will release these balls, which will glow as they whiz through the atmosphere, simulating the appearance of a meteor shower.

These balls are designed to glow bright enough to be seen even over light-polluted cities, according to reporting by science news site phys.org. Each glow-ball, or “star,” is expected to shine for a few seconds before they completely burn up. There is no risk of the balls falling low enough to cause any issues on Earth. ALE hopes that eventually, they will be able to provide the public with a “shooting stars on demand” service — the projected price of this service is not yet known.
...
The rocket released the satellite 310 miles (500 km) above the planet, but the satellite will naturally and gradually descend to 249 miles (400 km) throughout its orbit this year. Each of these microsatellites carries 400 of the mysterious glow-balls. Satellites will release up to 20 of these balls during each “meteor shower” event, so each microsatellite would be capable of putting on 20 to 30 events, the start-up says. According to the statement, ALE hopes to put on the first of these artificial meteor showers in the spring of 2020, with more to come, including plans for a second launch later this year.

Hiroshima was chosen for the viewing site of the inaugural artificial meteor shower because of its good weather, the topographical landscape, and its culture, ALE CEO Lena Okajima said. If the sky is clear for the event, millions of people in Hiroshima could witness the world’s first artificial meteor shower.
Did we just open the door to orbital billboards?

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Re: SPACE - random thread about space stuff

Post by Lassr » Mon Jan 28, 2019 11:17 pm

So while we were furloughed the Core Stage SLS LH2 tank was delivered to MSFC for testing. Here is pic they sent out today.
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Re: SPACE - random thread about space stuff

Post by Daehawk » Mon Jan 28, 2019 11:24 pm

A giant shotgun shell. Should get to orbit :) Thats really neat though.
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Re: SPACE - random thread about space stuff

Post by Lassr » Mon Jan 28, 2019 11:31 pm

It is also exciting that Blue Origin is building it's rocket engine plant in Huntsville and MSFC will get the Saturn test stands out of mothballs and test the engines. The loud roar of rocket engines will once again be heard throughout Huntsville. I'm excited.

https://gizmodo.com/blue-origin-breaks- ... 1832099251
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Re: SPACE - random thread about space stuff

Post by Kraken » Tue Jan 29, 2019 12:14 am

Lassr, what's your honest opinion of SLS's prospects after the scheduled test missions? Will NASA or other entities have enough missions to justify a $2 billion launch cost, in light of expected competition from the far cheaper BFR (at possibly as little as $10 million, you could launch 200 BFRs for the price of one SLS)? Do you foresee NASA conducting even one SLS launch per year? What missions can it mount that couldn't be done with multiple BFRs? Be candid; you're among friends.

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Re: SPACE - random thread about space stuff

Post by Lassr » Tue Jan 29, 2019 1:45 am

Kraken wrote:
Tue Jan 29, 2019 12:14 am
Lassr, what's your honest opinion of SLS's prospects after the scheduled test missions? Will NASA or other entities have enough missions to justify a $2 billion launch cost, in light of expected competition from the far cheaper BFR (at possibly as little as $10 million, you could launch 200 BFRs for the price of one SLS)? Do you foresee NASA conducting even one SLS launch per year? What missions can it mount that couldn't be done with multiple BFRs? Be candid; you're among friends.
If they have the goal of going back to the Moon permanently (then on to Mars, I doubt that happens in my lifetime in today's environment) then that will be its mission. It will be the largest rocket ever built and it's purpose was to do things no other rocket could accomplish. When the private companies finally get their rockets man rated then they will be used for LEO and we can get away from Russian rides. If the policy shifts away from the moon or deep space then what's the purpose of the rocket? We are building it so use it. My hope is a moon base and I think it will take international cooperation like the space station, and we'll have the rocket to do it.

It will be interesting to see what the final launch cost will be though, I know additive manufacturing has come along way and can cut down on manufacturing costs. But anytime you are transporting humans, safety adds a hefty price tag.
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Re: SPACE - random thread about space stuff

Post by Kraken » Tue Jan 29, 2019 3:02 am

Lassr wrote:
Tue Jan 29, 2019 1:45 am
But anytime you are transporting humans, safety adds a hefty price tag.
When you throw away an entire ginormous rocket it sure does. I should probably revive the space policy thread in R&P rather than pursue that here. Certain other topics have been using up all the oxygen in R&P.

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Re: SPACE - random thread about space stuff

Post by raydude » Tue Jan 29, 2019 7:11 am

Lassr wrote:
Tue Jan 29, 2019 1:45 am
Kraken wrote:
Tue Jan 29, 2019 12:14 am
Lassr, what's your honest opinion of SLS's prospects after the scheduled test missions? Will NASA or other entities have enough missions to justify a $2 billion launch cost, in light of expected competition from the far cheaper BFR (at possibly as little as $10 million, you could launch 200 BFRs for the price of one SLS)? Do you foresee NASA conducting even one SLS launch per year? What missions can it mount that couldn't be done with multiple BFRs? Be candid; you're among friends.
If they have the goal of going back to the Moon permanently (then on to Mars, I doubt that happens in my lifetime in today's environment) then that will be its mission. It will be the largest rocket ever built and it's purpose was to do things no other rocket could accomplish. When the private companies finally get their rockets man rated then they will be used for LEO and we can get away from Russian rides. If the policy shifts away from the moon or deep space then what's the purpose of the rocket? We are building it so use it. My hope is a moon base and I think it will take international cooperation like the space station, and we'll have the rocket to do it.

It will be interesting to see what the final launch cost will be though, I know additive manufacturing has come along way and can cut down on manufacturing costs. But anytime you are transporting humans, safety adds a hefty price tag.
The SLS is also the planned launch vehicle for Europa Clipper, an unmanned space probe that will execute flybys of Jupiter's moon. Lassr makes good points about the heavy lift capability being ideally suited for trips to the moon to setup a moon base.

I would argue that SLS, due to its cost, should be restricted to the types of missions for which heavy lift is a necessity, and not have NASA try to find missions to justify it. For all the glee and joy a rocket launch brings it is still just an earth to space taxi, IMHO. NASA is far better when it designs the payloads that go in the space taxis - from unmanned probes that answer unique and evolving questions about our solar system to manned flight to push humans back into space. Leave the space taxi business to companies that can build better taxis; the one-of-a-kind handcrafted spacecraft and human exploration missions is where NASA shines.

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Re: SPACE - random thread about space stuff

Post by Kraken » Tue Jan 29, 2019 12:24 pm

raydude wrote:
Tue Jan 29, 2019 7:11 am
Lassr wrote:
Tue Jan 29, 2019 1:45 am
Kraken wrote:
Tue Jan 29, 2019 12:14 am
Lassr, what's your honest opinion of SLS's prospects after the scheduled test missions? Will NASA or other entities have enough missions to justify a $2 billion launch cost, in light of expected competition from the far cheaper BFR (at possibly as little as $10 million, you could launch 200 BFRs for the price of one SLS)? Do you foresee NASA conducting even one SLS launch per year? What missions can it mount that couldn't be done with multiple BFRs? Be candid; you're among friends.
If they have the goal of going back to the Moon permanently (then on to Mars, I doubt that happens in my lifetime in today's environment) then that will be its mission. It will be the largest rocket ever built and it's purpose was to do things no other rocket could accomplish. When the private companies finally get their rockets man rated then they will be used for LEO and we can get away from Russian rides. If the policy shifts away from the moon or deep space then what's the purpose of the rocket? We are building it so use it. My hope is a moon base and I think it will take international cooperation like the space station, and we'll have the rocket to do it.

It will be interesting to see what the final launch cost will be though, I know additive manufacturing has come along way and can cut down on manufacturing costs. But anytime you are transporting humans, safety adds a hefty price tag.
The SLS is also the planned launch vehicle for Europa Clipper, an unmanned space probe that will execute flybys of Jupiter's moon. Lassr makes good points about the heavy lift capability being ideally suited for trips to the moon to setup a moon base.

I would argue that SLS, due to its cost, should be restricted to the types of missions for which heavy lift is a necessity, and not have NASA try to find missions to justify it. For all the glee and joy a rocket launch brings it is still just an earth to space taxi, IMHO. NASA is far better when it designs the payloads that go in the space taxis - from unmanned probes that answer unique and evolving questions about our solar system to manned flight to push humans back into space. Leave the space taxi business to companies that can build better taxis; the one-of-a-kind handcrafted spacecraft and human exploration missions is where NASA shines.
It's my understanding that NASA has not yet decided between SLS and Falcon Heavy for Europa Clipper. The former would get it there in 3 years at a launch cost of around $2 billion, while the latter would take 5-6 years for under $100 million. I know NASA really wants to use its amazing new rocket, but paying 20x as much to cut the time in half seems like a hard call to make. Am I wrong about that -- has NASA indeed committed to SLS?

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Re: SPACE - random thread about space stuff

Post by Daehawk » Tue Jan 29, 2019 12:52 pm

I cant believe that after visiting the moon ..the moon!....all we've done is low Earth orbit. We should have a full Luna base with mining and processing. Maybe even a Mars visit or base...or one out there somewhere. But Im just a dream. I was born in 69 and got to watch those last moon rockets. I thought we were destined for more.
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Re: SPACE - random thread about space stuff

Post by Moliere » Thu Jan 31, 2019 9:03 pm

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Re: SPACE - random thread about space stuff

Post by Lassr » Wed Feb 06, 2019 8:20 pm

Went and looked at the tank today.

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Re: SPACE - random thread about space stuff

Post by Enough » Thu Feb 07, 2019 2:33 pm

The Chinese satellite managed to get what I think is an incredibly iconic photo of the dark side of the moon with the earth in the background:

Image

Image
The satellite first provided the team with partial images of the Moon and Earth back in October, but then was inactive to avoid interfering with China's Chang'e 4 Lunar mission. The satellite resumed activity on January 19 and captured a time-lapse, including one featuring the Moon's far side and Earth, on February 3.


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Re: SPACE - random thread about space stuff

Post by wonderpug » Thu Feb 07, 2019 2:49 pm

mooning - the recreational act of baring one's rear end in public with the intention of it being seen by people who don't want, or expect, to see it.

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Re: SPACE - random thread about space stuff

Post by Isgrimnur » Thu Feb 07, 2019 3:03 pm

Thanos moon base confirmed.
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Re: SPACE - random thread about space stuff

Post by Daehawk » Thu Feb 07, 2019 11:12 pm

Every pic Ive seen from the Chinese stuff looks so fake to me. Almost NK Photoshop fake. Im thinking it must be some type of HD camera its using..or it is all fake. But I think it must be the HD or something.
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Re: SPACE - random thread about space stuff

Post by Daehawk » Fri Feb 08, 2019 12:51 am

https://www.engadget.com/2019/02/06/hay ... ding-date/
Hayabusa 2 will finally start mining an asteroid on February 22nd
https://www.gofundme.com/please-help-di ... -wife-died ....Help for me to take care of stuff . Wife died Jan 3 2019 after 31 years. My soulmate.
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Re: SPACE - random thread about space stuff

Post by Daehawk » Mon Feb 11, 2019 6:28 pm

https://www.gofundme.com/please-help-di ... -wife-died ....Help for me to take care of stuff . Wife died Jan 3 2019 after 31 years. My soulmate.
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Re: SPACE - random thread about space stuff

Post by Moliere » Mon Feb 11, 2019 8:27 pm

Do you like Earth's solid surface and life-inclined climate? Thank your lucky (massive) star
Earth's solid surface and moderate climate may be due, in part, to a massive star in the birth environment of the Sun, according to new computer simulations of planet formation.

Without the star's radioactive elements injected into the early solar system, our home planet could be a hostile ocean world covered in global ice sheets.

"The results of our simulations suggest that there are two qualitatively different types of planetary systems," said Tim Lichtenberg of the National Centre of Competence in Research PlanetS in Switzerland. "There are those similar to our solar system, whose planets have little water, and those in which primarily ocean worlds are created because no massive star was around when their host system formed."
"The world is suffering more today from the good people who want to mind other men's business than it is from the bad people who are willing to let everybody look after their own individual affairs." - Clarence Darrow

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Re: SPACE - random thread about space stuff

Post by Isgrimnur » Thu Feb 14, 2019 3:42 pm

SPHEREx
NASA has announced a new space telescope mission dedicated to understanding the origins of life and the universe. It's called the Spectro-Photometer for the History of the Universe, Epoch of Reionization and Ices Explorer or SPHEREx, for short. The space agency is aiming for a 2023 launch and has already earmarked $242 million for the project, not including launch costs, which is supposed to last for at least two years.

Once SPHEREx is already in orbit, it will observe and collect data on over 300 million galaxies, some as far as 10 billion light-years away from Earth, and 100 million stars in our own Milky Way every six months. It will use technologies adapted from Earth satellites and Mars spacecraft to survey the sky in optical and near-infrared light. Since it will use 96 wavelengths in all, it will give NASA a way to create an extremely detailed sky map with a resolution that's much, much higher than previous ones.
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Re: SPACE - random thread about space stuff

Post by Daehawk » Thu Feb 14, 2019 4:41 pm

I remember when they built the KECK in Hawaii and it was special because of the space between the two telescopes. So i wonder why they dont use the space telescopes we have now to take same time pics or near bouts of the same spots...stereoscopic space telescopes. Or build a pair.
https://www.gofundme.com/please-help-di ... -wife-died ....Help for me to take care of stuff . Wife died Jan 3 2019 after 31 years. My soulmate.
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I guess Ray Butts has ate his last pancake.
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Re: SPACE - random thread about space stuff

Post by Isgrimnur » Thu Feb 14, 2019 5:11 pm

Keck
The Interferometer allowed the light from both Keck telescopes to be combined into an 85-metre (279 ft) baseline, near infrared, optical interferometer.
Space Interferometry Mission
The Space Interferometry Mission, or SIM, also known as SIM Lite (formerly known as SIM PlanetQuest), was a planned space telescope proposed by the U.S. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), in conjunction with contractor Northrop Grumman. One of the main goals of the mission was the hunt for Earth-sized planets orbiting in the habitable zones of nearby stars other than the Sun. SIM was postponed several times and finally cancelled in 2010.
...
The SIM Lite telescope functions through optical interferometry. SIM was to be composed of one science interferometer (50 cm collectors, 6 m separation [baseline]), a guide interferometer (30 cm collectors, 4.2 m baseline), and a guide telescope (30 cm aperture).[
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