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SPACE - random thread about space stuff

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Isgrimnur
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Re: SPACE - random thread about space stuff

Post by Isgrimnur »

raydude wrote:
Tue Aug 14, 2018 9:36 am
APL's Parker Solar Probe launched on Sunday*. Folks at the Lab are pretty excited about it.

* Coincidentally also my birthday so that was cool.
Physics World
The closest ever mission to the Sun has discovered dynamic structures in the solar wind that will help explain how this flux of charged particles is created and evolves as it travels out into space. The results are highly relevant here on Earth because the solar wind generates space weather including solar storms, which can damage power grids, communication networks and satellites.

NASA’s Parker Solar Probe launched in 2018 and has made measurements of the Sun from a distance of just 24 million km. This is less than half the distance between Mercury and the Sun.

The first results from the mission show bizarre S-shaped bends in the solar wind, which is a stream of energetic charged particles riding through the Solar System on magnetic field lines emanating from the Sun. There are two main components to the solar wind: the fast wind that appears to emanate from magnetic gaps in the Sun’s corona; and the slow wind, which is more of a puzzle.

Indeed, understanding how the particles in the solar wind are accelerated, and what role the heating of the corona (the Sun’s the million-degree-hot atmosphere) has in this, is the greatest mystery facing solar physicists.
...
The connection between what happens in the Sun’s immediate environment with the dynamics of the solar wind has also been explored by Parker Solar Probe. In particular, small eruptions of plasma from magnetic instabilities on the Sun have been observed feeding the solar wind.

“The solar magnetic field is directly related to solar wind fluctuations,” says Russell Howard, who is the Principal Investigator on the mission’s Wide-field Imager for Solar Probe (WISPR) instrument. It seems that close to the Sun, it is disturbances in the Sun’s volatile magnetic field that governs the structure of the solar wind, whereas at greater distances, such a near Earth, the kinetic energy of the charged particles in the wind is able to dominate over magnetic field effects.

WISPR also found evidence for a dust-free zone near the Sun, which was first predicted 90 years ago by the American astronomy Henry Russell, of Hertzsprung–Russell diagram fame. This dust is cleared out from the environment near the Sun by heating that prompts the dust to evaporate, or radiation pressure blowing it away.

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Re: SPACE - random thread about space stuff

Post by raydude »

So this happened to OSIRIS-Rex this past October. Missed downlink opportunity meant possibly not having downloaded images from which to determine spacecraft position and attitude more accurately, which meant possibly missing the Osprey target site. The article makes it seem more dramatic than it really was. At worst we would have suffered a delay in picking the TAG site but the mission already had margin to accommodate minor delays.

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Re: SPACE - random thread about space stuff

Post by Kraken »

How many light-minutes away is Bennu?

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Re: SPACE - random thread about space stuff

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Kraken wrote:
Thu Dec 12, 2019 11:52 pm
How many light-minutes away is Bennu?
15.16

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Re: SPACE - random thread about space stuff

Post by raydude »

Isgrimnur wrote:
Fri Dec 13, 2019 10:46 am
Kraken wrote:
Thu Dec 12, 2019 11:52 pm
How many light-minutes away is Bennu?
15.16
Thanks to you guys I discovered a bug on the website. If you stay on that "where is the spacecraft" page and convert from km to miles the "distance from earth" box starts decreasing rapidly while the "total distance traveled" starts increasing rapidly. Those aren't real values, as evidenced by switching back and forth between km to miles. I let them know there is a bug.

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Re: SPACE - random thread about space stuff

Post by Isgrimnur »

raydude wrote:
Fri Dec 13, 2019 12:05 pm
Isgrimnur wrote:
Fri Dec 13, 2019 10:46 am
Kraken wrote:
Thu Dec 12, 2019 11:52 pm
How many light-minutes away is Bennu?
15.16
Thanks to you guys I discovered a bug on the website. If you stay on that "where is the spacecraft" page and convert from km to miles the "distance from earth" box starts decreasing rapidly while the "total distance traveled" starts increasing rapidly. Those aren't real values, as evidenced by switching back and forth between km to miles. I let them know there is a bug.
So you're saying that I can recall the satellite to the planet through a website?

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Re: SPACE - random thread about space stuff

Post by stessier »

Isgrimnur wrote:
Fri Dec 13, 2019 12:08 pm
raydude wrote:
Fri Dec 13, 2019 12:05 pm
Isgrimnur wrote:
Fri Dec 13, 2019 10:46 am
Kraken wrote:
Thu Dec 12, 2019 11:52 pm
How many light-minutes away is Bennu?
15.16
Thanks to you guys I discovered a bug on the website. If you stay on that "where is the spacecraft" page and convert from km to miles the "distance from earth" box starts decreasing rapidly while the "total distance traveled" starts increasing rapidly. Those aren't real values, as evidenced by switching back and forth between km to miles. I let them know there is a bug.
So you're saying that I can recall the satellite to the planet through a website?
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Re: SPACE - random thread about space stuff

Post by raydude »

Isgrimnur wrote:
Fri Dec 13, 2019 12:08 pm
raydude wrote:
Fri Dec 13, 2019 12:05 pm
Isgrimnur wrote:
Fri Dec 13, 2019 10:46 am
Kraken wrote:
Thu Dec 12, 2019 11:52 pm
How many light-minutes away is Bennu?
15.16
Thanks to you guys I discovered a bug on the website. If you stay on that "where is the spacecraft" page and convert from km to miles the "distance from earth" box starts decreasing rapidly while the "total distance traveled" starts increasing rapidly. Those aren't real values, as evidenced by switching back and forth between km to miles. I let them know there is a bug.
So you're saying that I can recall the satellite to the planet through a website?
Not only that, you can make it instantaneously jump hundreds of miles by clicking back and forth between km and miles!

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Re: SPACE - random thread about space stuff

Post by Kraken »

Isgrimnur wrote:
Fri Dec 13, 2019 10:46 am
Kraken wrote:
Thu Dec 12, 2019 11:52 pm
How many light-minutes away is Bennu?
15.16
So by the time we realize the Bennunians have launched an interceptor, it's already too late to raise shields. One hopes the spacecraft is sufficiently autonomous to cope.

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Re: SPACE - random thread about space stuff

Post by raydude »

Kraken wrote:
Fri Dec 13, 2019 12:43 pm
Isgrimnur wrote:
Fri Dec 13, 2019 10:46 am
Kraken wrote:
Thu Dec 12, 2019 11:52 pm
How many light-minutes away is Bennu?
15.16
So by the time we realize the Bennunians have launched an interceptor, it's already too late to raise shields. One hopes the spacecraft is sufficiently autonomous to cope.
Speaking of autonomous interceptors...

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Re: SPACE - random thread about space stuff

Post by Isgrimnur »

CHEOPS
Europe's CHEOPS planet-hunting space telescope left Earth on Wednesday and moved into orbit, a day after its lift-off was delayed by a technical rocket glitch during the final countdown.

The telescope will measure the density, composition and size of planets beyond our Solar System - known as exoplanets.

According to the European Space Agency (ESA), CHEOPS will observe bright stars that are already known to be orbited by planets.
...
CHEOPS, an acronym for CHaracterising ExOPlanet Satellite, will seek to better understand what these planets are made of.

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Re: SPACE - random thread about space stuff

Post by Max Peck »

Whoops...

A Dramatic Error in American Spaceflight
It was a picture-perfect launch, just before sunrise on a sandy coastline. The rocket, bright as a candle flame, climbed steadily, leaving a spindly trail of smoke that split the sky in half, with the sharp darkness of night on one side and the first pastel hues of daylight on the other. It carried a capsule, bound for the International Space Station, to the edge of space and let go.

The trouble started after that. The capsule, built for NASA by Boeing, was supposed to ignite its own engines to boost itself higher into orbit, where it would chase after the space station. But the engines didn’t start when they should have. Engineers watched, unable to help from below, as the spacecraft became disoriented.

Before the launch, NASA was optimistic. SpaceX had carried out a similar mission earlier in the year, and that effort was a success from start to finish. But Boeing’s attempt to reach the ISS has failed.
According to NASA officials, after Starliner separated from the rocket, the capsule missed the moment it needed to ignite its engines for a carefully timed and fully automated process known as an orbital insertion burn. Without that step, the spacecraft couldn’t fire the thrusters to shove itself into the correct orbit. The problem was, of all things, its clock. The system that tracks how much time has passed since launch—and that guides when maneuvers happen—experienced an error. The glitch confused Starliner, making the capsule lose track of time. When engineers realized what was going on, they scrambled to send new commands to the capsule.

But the craft was flying just out of reach of communication, between two satellites. When engineers could finally contact Starliner, they made the spacecraft thrust itself higher, but it was too late. The confused capsule had been burning fuel to maintain its position, and didn’t have enough left to execute that crucial push toward the ISS.

Starliner had no choice now but to return to Earth. The capsule was supposed to circle the planet for about a day until it reached the ISS. It was to dock autonomously with the station and remain there for a week before detaching, streaking through the atmosphere, and parachuting down in New Mexico.

Engineers will now instruct the capsule to fire up its engines a few more times this afternoon to get into the right position for a landing on Sunday.
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Re: SPACE - random thread about space stuff

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Man Boeing just cant seem to do anything right these days.
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Re: SPACE - random thread about space stuff

Post by Kraken »

It's a setback for Boeing -- which received $1.6B more than SpaceX did -- that gives SpaceX a good shot at being first to carry passengers, if they ace their in-flight abort test next month. If they fail that, it's a big setback for NASA's commercial crew program -- they're going to have to buy more seats from the Russians.

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Re: SPACE - random thread about space stuff

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Man I hope SpaceX didn't install those metal windows on their capsules.
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Re: SPACE - random thread about space stuff

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Daehawk wrote:Man I hope SpaceX didn't install those metal windows on their capsules.
I understood that reference!

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Re: SPACE - random thread about space stuff

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Re: SPACE - random thread about space stuff

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Science Alert
It was found along the side of a road in a remote Australian gold rush town. In the old days, Wedderburn was a hotspot for prospectors – it occasionally still is – but nobody there had ever seen a nugget quite like this one.

The Wedderburn meteorite, found just north-east of the town in 1951, was a small 210-gram chunk of strange-looking space rock that fell out of the sky. For decades, scientists have been trying to decipher its secrets, and researchers just decoded another.

In a study published in August this year, led by Caltech mineralogist Chi Ma, scientists analysed the Wedderburn meteorite and verified the first natural occurrence of what they call 'edscottite': a rare form of iron-carbide mineral that's never been found in nature.

Since the Wedderburn meteorite's spacey origins were first identified, the distinctive black-and-red rock has been examined by numerous research teams – to the extent that only about one-third of the original specimen still remains intact, held within the geological collection at Museums Victoria in Australia.

The rest has been taken away in a series of slices, extracted to analyse what the meteorite is made from. Those analyses have revealed traces of gold and iron, along with rarer minerals such as kamacite, schreibersite, taenite, and troilite. Now we can add edscottite to that list.

The edscottite discovery – named in honour of meteorite expert and cosmochemist Edward Scott from the University of Hawaii – is significant because never before have we confirmed that this distinct atomic formulation of iron carbide mineral occurs naturally.

Such a confirmation is important, because it's a pre-requisite for minerals to be officially recognised as such by the International Mineralogical Association (IMA).

A synthetic version of the iron carbide mineral has been known about for decades – a phase produced during iron smelting.

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Re: SPACE - random thread about space stuff

Post by Isgrimnur »

CNN
When astronauts encounter a medical risk on the International Space Station 250 miles up from the Earth's surface, it's not exactly easy for a doctor to make a house call.

So when NASA researchers suspected a blood clot in one of their astronauts during a long-duration stay on the space station last year, they had to act quickly to treat the unexpected risk.

The blood clot was detected during a vascular study of 11 astronauts on the station to assess the effect of space on the internal jugular vein. In zero gravity, astronauts' blood and tissue fluid shifts toward the head.

The study involved nine men and two women with an average age of 46. The identities of the astronauts were not included in the study.
...
Six of the astronauts experienced stagnant or reverse blood flow, one had a blood clot and another was found to have a potential partial blood clot. None exhibited symptoms and the findings wouldn't have been apparent without the study.
...
Dr. Stephen Moll at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill's School of Medicine was the only non-NASA physician consulted to help the astronaut in real time.
...
Moll spoke with the astronaut during a "phone call from space," consulting with them as if they were one of his other patients.

The pharmacy on the space station contained 20 vials with 300 milligrams each of an injectable blood thinner, which the astronaut was directed to use on a daily basis until an anticoagulant drug could be sent up to the station on a resupply mission.

Injections themselves can be challenging on the station. Syringes, like other supplies, are limited and zero gravity has an effect on liquids as they are drawn from
containers. The astronaut took a higher dose of the injectable, enoxaparin, for 33 days to control the risk of the blood clot. That dose was lowered after 33 days as the astronaut awaited the arrival of the drug apixaban.

The researchers watched the clot shrink over time. Blood flow was induced after 47 days through the vein, but actual spontaneous blood flow was not achieved even after 90 days of treatment.

After landing, the blood clot disappeared once 24 hours had passed. Six months later, the astronaut was still asymptomatic. The astronaut also had no family history of blood clots.

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Re: SPACE - random thread about space stuff

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CNBC
Two old, out-of-control spacecraft are currently on a possible collision course above Pittsburgh on Wednesday night, hurtling toward each other in orbit.

The objects are set to cross paths at 6:39 p.m. EST and will come within at least 40 feet of each other, according to space radar company LeoLabs. That puts the the probability of a collision at 1 in 100, the company says, which is an exceptionally high likelihood.

“The way the industry works today, one in 10,000 is considered noteworthy, one in 1,000 is considered an emergency event and one in 100 is extremely concerning,” LeoLabs CEO Dan Ceperley told CNBC.
...
One of the spacecraft is a large decommissioned telescope, launched in 1983, and the other is an experimental U.S. spacecraft launched in 1967. The latter object has an 60-foot-long boom sticking out from it, LeoLabs noted, which means the probability of a collision is as low as 1 in 20 when accounting for the size of the object.

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Re: SPACE - random thread about space stuff

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Id be curious to see pics or silhouettes of all the significant objects in orbit and be able to rank them by how long they've been up there. I bet theres some neat stuff floating around us....and lots of secret stuff.
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Re: SPACE - random thread about space stuff

Post by Isgrimnur »

Phys.org
The first is the Infrared Astronomical Satellite (IRAS), a large space telescope weighing around a tonne and launched in 1983. It successfully completed its mission later that year and has floated dormant ever since.

The second satellite has a slightly more intriguing story. Known as GGSE-4, it is a formerly secret government satellite launched in 1967. It was part of a much larger project to capture radar emissions from the Soviet Union. This particular satellite also contained an experiment to explore ways to stabilize satellites using gravity.
...
The good news is that the two satellites appear to have missed one another. Although there were a handful of eyewitness accounts of the IRAS satellite appearing to pass unharmed through the predicted point of impact, it can still take a few hours for scientists to confirm that a collision did not take place. LeoLabs has since confirmed it has not detected any new space debris.

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Re: SPACE - random thread about space stuff

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RIP Spitzer
After 16 years of incredible discoveries, NASA's retiring Spitzer Space Telescope is going gently into that good night, slumbering against a background of stars -- the very ones it helped study.

The infrared telescope completed science activities on Tuesday, relayed back data on Wednesday and on Thursday will enter a safe hibernation mode thanks to a command sent from the engineering team.

It will continue to orbit the sun, at times trailing behind Earth and other times ahead of us, in a debris-free area 160 million miles away, said mission manager Joseph Hunt.
...
NASA's James Webb Space Telescope will be our new infrared eye in the sky when it launches next year. It will also be able to follow up on discoveries made by Spitzer.
...
Spitzer was designed to observe "the cold, the old and the dusty." This included objects too cold to emit visible light; incredibly distant galaxies and stars; and into the very dust of the universe's building blocks.

The telescope was named in honor of the late astrophysicist Lyman Spitzer, Jr., a proponent of space telescopes.

Spitzer is a cold telescope in an orbit that trails Earth, both of which enabled it to be so sensitive to detecting infrared light and radiation. It was the first telescope in this kind of orbit because it allowed the mission to avoid infrared radiation from Earth.

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Re: SPACE - random thread about space stuff

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Newest pictures of our sun's surface.

https://www.cnn.com/2020/01/29/world/su ... index.html

The Daniel K. Inouye Solar Telescope has produced the highest resolution image of the sun's surface ever taken. In this picture, taken at 789 nanometers (nm), we can see features as small as 18 miles in size for the first time ever. The image shows a pattern of turbulent, "boiling" gas that covers the entire sun.
Image
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Re: SPACE - random thread about space stuff

Post by Isgrimnur »

ars technica
During its quarterly meeting on Thursday, NASA's Aersopace Safety Advisory Panel dropped some significant news about a critical commercial crew test flight. The panel revealed that Boeing's Starliner may have been lost during a December mission had a software error not been found and fixed while the vehicle was in orbit.

The software issue was identified during testing on the ground after Starliner's launch, said panel member Paul Hill, a former flight director and former director of mission operations at Johnson Space Center in Houston. The problem would have interfered with the service module's (SM) separation from the Starliner capsule.
...
But the public remarks by Hill on Thursday appear to underscore the seriousness of the issue, and the safety panel recommended several reviews of Boeing. "The panel has a larger concern with the rigor of Boeing's verification processes," Hill said. "As a result, the panel recommends that NASA pursue not just the root cause of these specific flight-software anomalies but also a Boeing assessment of and corrective actions for Boeing's flight-software integration and testing processes."

The safety panel also recommended that NASA conduct "an even broader" assessment of Boeing's Systems Engineering and Integration processes. Only after these assessments, Hill said, should NASA determine whether the Starliner spacecraft will conduct a second, uncrewed flight test into orbit before astronauts fly on board. (Boeing recently set aside $410 million to pay for that contingency).

Finally, before the meeting ended, the chair of the safety panel, Patricia Sanders, noted yet another ongoing evaluation of Boeing. "Given the potential for systemic issues at Boeing, I would also note that NASA has decided to proceed with an organizational safety assessment with Boeing as they previously conducted with SpaceX," she said.

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Re: SPACE - random thread about space stuff

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Boeing cant seem to do anything right these days. Its like they are trying to go out of business.
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Re: SPACE - random thread about space stuff

Post by jztemple2 »

Interesting article: Boat Captain's Surprise Haul: SpaceX Dragon Capsule Hatch. There is a video on the page.

Enlarge Image
BREVARD COUNTY, Fla. — A routine fishing trip recently turned into an "out of this world" find for a retired Brevard County boat captain.

Capt. David Stokes knows the waters off Ponce Inlet very well — the lifelong resident is more comfortable on water than he is on land. "I had a charter boat out here for 30 years," Stokes said. "It's in my blood I guess. Big game tuna, marlin, sailfish." Even though he's now retired, he still heads out on the Atlantic Ocean looking for a big catch.

On January 30, he set out on a typical trip 30 miles out with some friends. Right after catching a wahoo, the group saw something unusual floating on the water and began recording it with a phone. Stokes is a self-professed space geek — and knew right away what it was. SpaceX had just performed a successful launch abort test January 19 from down the coast at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. The item floating on the water? It was an intact SpaceX Dragon capsule hatch. "The way it was floating, I knew there was a lot of weight connected to it," he says. But there was more: The two drogue parachutes were underwater, and it took an effort to pull them aboard.

Stokes says it's the most unusual catch he's made in his career. He says the group has contacted SpaceX about the find but haven't heard back. He does have one hope though. "Maybe get Elon Musk to sign it for us (laughs) or maybe get SpaceX to come by finally and inspect it," Stokes says. SpaceX has a debris recovery hotline at 1-866-623-0234.

Spectrum News 13's legal team says that because of maritime law, anything found floating in the ocean is fair game to keep.
I'm not sure about that last statement. My understanding of maritime law is that as long as the original owner is actively trying to recover any object lost in the sea, the ownership of the object remains with original owner.
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Re: SPACE - random thread about space stuff

Post by Daehawk »

Two stories for today. Neat stuff.

Something in Deep Space Is Sending Signals to Earth in Steady 16-Day Cycles
A mysterious radio source located in a galaxy 500 million light years from Earth is pulsing on a 16-day cycle, like clockwork, according to a new study. This marks the first time that scientists have ever detected periodicity in these signals, which are known as fast radio bursts (FRBs), and is a major step toward unmasking their sources.
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

NASA brings Voyager 2 fully back online, 11.5 billion miles from Earth
In an incredible feat of remote engineering, NASA has fixed one of the most intrepid explorers in human history. Voyager 2, currently some 11.5 billion miles from Earth, is back online and resuming its mission to collect scientific data on the solar system and the interstellar space beyond.
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Re: SPACE - random thread about space stuff

Post by Isgrimnur »

Space
Northrop Grumman aborted the launch of a commercial Cygnus cargo ship to the International Space Station Sunday (Feb. 9) due to a sensor issue at the mission's Virginia launchpad.

The Cygnus spacecraft, filled with NASA supplies, was set to launch atop an Antares rocket — also built by Northrop Grumman — at 5:44 p.m. EST (2244 GMT) from Pad-0A of the Mid-Atlantic Regional Spaceport here at NASA's Wallops Flight Facility. But minutes before that liftoff, Northrop Grumman called of the launch try due to "off-nominal readings from a ground support sensor," the company said in a statement.

NASA and Northrop Grumman are now targeting the launch for no earlier than Thursday, Feb. 13, at 4:05 p.m. EST (2105 GMT), weather permitting. There were launch opportunities on Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday, but Northrop Grumman opted to skip them "due to an unfavorable weather forecast over the next two days, and time required to address the ground support issue," the company said.

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Re: SPACE - random thread about space stuff

Post by Isgrimnur »

Space
Solar Orbiter, an international collaboration between the European Space Agency (ESA) and NASA, is scheduled to launch from here on Sunday (Feb. 9). Its goal: to study the sun up close.

To do so, the craft is outfitted with a suite of 10 instruments — four in-situ instruments and six imagers — that will make detailed observations, providing a comprehensive view of our star. The spacecraft will also capture the first images of the sun's polar regions. Liftoff is set for at 11:03 p.m. EST (0403 GMT on Feb. 10).

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Re: SPACE - random thread about space stuff

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Isgrimnur wrote:
Sun Feb 09, 2020 10:32 pm
Space
Solar Orbiter, an international collaboration between the European Space Agency (ESA) and NASA, is scheduled to launch from here on Sunday (Feb. 9). Its goal: to study the sun up close.

To do so, the craft is outfitted with a suite of 10 instruments — four in-situ instruments and six imagers — that will make detailed observations, providing a comprehensive view of our star. The spacecraft will also capture the first images of the sun's polar regions. Liftoff is set for at 11:03 p.m. EST (0403 GMT on Feb. 10).
I have my alarm set for eleven so I'll remember to run walk outside and watch.
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Re: SPACE - random thread about space stuff

Post by Kraken »

It's kind of odd to think that we've never seen the sun's poles. I wonder if there are ice caps.

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Re: SPACE - random thread about space stuff

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Enlarge Image
"...and so we can get very close to the Sun, we are planning to go at night".
The book historian Richard Altick once wrote, “There has always been a popular belief that more than casual attention to books is either a symptom or a cause of madness.”

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Re: SPACE - random thread about space stuff

Post by Isgrimnur »

Isgrimnur wrote:
Thu Dec 19, 2019 11:00 am
CHEOPS
CHEOPS, an acronym for CHaracterising ExOPlanet Satellite, will seek to better understand what these planets are made of.
Space
Image
The images themselves are blurry, but that was expected as the telescope had been intentionally defocused to allow for better photometric precision: Defocusing the telescope allows for greater precision because it smooths out the light over many pixels, according to the statement.

So, while the image isn't super clear, it's precise, which is necessary for the probe to spot small changes in the brightness of stars outside of our solar system — observations that will help the probe to spot exoplanets transiting, or passing, in front of their star.

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Re: SPACE - random thread about space stuff

Post by morlac »

Daehawk wrote:
Thu Feb 06, 2020 8:49 pm
Boeing cant seem to do anything right these days. Its like they are trying to go out of business.
They haven't had this much competition in a bit and they have gotten complacent. Just reading the linked: "Finally, before the meeting ended, the chair of the safety panel, Patricia Sanders, noted yet another ongoing evaluation of Boeing. "Given the potential for systemic issues at Boeing, I would also note that NASA has decided to proceed with an organizational safety assessment with Boeing as they previously conducted with SpaceX," she said."

They are finally being held to the same standards as Space X? I suppose they were Grandfatehred in? Getting harder to pay off the politicians due to Space X kicking your ass? Good!

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Re: SPACE - random thread about space stuff

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February 14, 2020. Thirty years ago today, after passing Neptune on its way out of the solar system, Voyager-1 snapped Earth's first selfie -- the famous "Pale Blue Dot". Carl Sagan poignantly reflected on that image, with words that continue to resonate today.

[Video: 3min]

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Re: SPACE - random thread about space stuff

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https://www.gofundme.com/please-help-di ... -wife-died ....Help for me to take care of stuff . Wife died Jan 3 2019 after 31 years. My soulmate.
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Re: SPACE - random thread about space stuff

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Astronomers detect biggest explosion in the history of the Universe
Scientists studying a distant galaxy cluster have discovered the biggest explosion seen in the Universe since the Big Bang.

The blast came from a supermassive black hole at the centre of a galaxy hundreds of millions of light-years away.

It released five times more energy than the previous record holder.
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Re: SPACE - random thread about space stuff

Post by Jaymann »

That's old news (literally).
Jaymann
]==(:::::::::::::>

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Re: SPACE - random thread about space stuff

Post by malchior »

morlac wrote:
Thu Feb 13, 2020 12:00 pm
They are finally being held to the same standards as Space X? I suppose they were Grandfatehred in? Getting harder to pay off the politicians due to Space X kicking your ass? Good!
So much about being held to the same standards. Boeing admitted that they didn't do end-to-end testing before the unmanned test flight which would have caught the errors that led to the failure of the mission.

Nonetheless, somehow they are reportedly thinking about giving them a pass and letting them go on to manned testing. Good luck to anyone who is willing to jump in a seat to be on that test flight.
Mulholland said that going forward, Boeing will continue doing tests in smaller chunks, but it will also conduct longer end-to-end testing. According to The Washington Post, NASA is still thinking whether to allow Boeing to proceed with its first manned flight to prevent delays or to require the company to successfully complete an unmanned flight first.

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