Amazon has whacked our affiliate account. Hosting Donations/Commitments $2063 of $1920 (Sept 13/18). In Hand $1466 (Lump sum payments minus paypal graft). Paypal Donation Link Here

Death Penalty

For discussion of religion and politics

Moderators: LawBeefaroni, $iljanus

User avatar
Moliere
Posts: 12007
Joined: Sun Sep 03, 2006 10:57 am
Location: Walking through a desert land

Re: Death Penalty

Post by Moliere » Wed Apr 29, 2015 12:19 pm

Axl Rose's Letter to Indonesian President Regarding Bali Nine
The singer wrote that not sparing the prisoners' lives would be a "cold, cruel and uncaring message of hopelessness," and he pleaded that Joko not be "blinded by rigidity and inflexibility." He also called their death sentences "draconian" and the act of killing them "barbaric, backward and truly disgraceful."

"It's true I do not know these men nor have I met them but their story has touched me deeply," Rose wrote. "I as well as many others could easily have found ourselves in their unfortunate and unarguably self-inflicted position. People make mistakes, sometimes big and horribly regrettable mistakes and sometimes more importantly people learn from their mistakes and make new choices, strive and succeed at true positive change. To not acknowledge and give such change the opportunity to prove it's value would seem in this case a greater crime than those originally committed."
"The world is suffering more today from the good people who want to mind other men's business than it is from the bad people who are willing to let everybody look after their own individual affairs." - Clarence Darrow

User avatar
Moliere
Posts: 12007
Joined: Sun Sep 03, 2006 10:57 am
Location: Walking through a desert land

Re: Death Penalty

Post by Moliere » Thu Jun 04, 2015 6:05 pm

2 Brothers Pardoned, Clearing Way for Them to Receive $750K
When DNA evidence freed two brothers wrongfully imprisoned for an 11-year-old girl's killing, each was given $45 by prison officials.

Nine months later, pardons issued Thursday by North Carolina's governor have cleared the way for Henry McCollum and Leon Brown to receive $750,000 each from the state for spending three decades in prison. It's been a long wait for the men who have been relying on help from family and donations while their application was pending.

The brothers' family, friends and attorneys were jubilant in early September after a judge vacated their convictions and ordered their release, citing new DNA evidence that points to another man killing and raping 11-year-old Sabrina Buie in 1983.
Thirty years on Death Row because of a coerced confession and zero physical evidence. :cry:
"The world is suffering more today from the good people who want to mind other men's business than it is from the bad people who are willing to let everybody look after their own individual affairs." - Clarence Darrow

User avatar
Rip
Posts: 26878
Joined: Tue Oct 12, 2004 9:34 pm
Location: Cajun Country!
Contact:
Rip’s avatar
Online

Re: Death Penalty

Post by Rip » Sun Jun 21, 2015 4:22 pm

Hopefully these two killers that have escaped don't have the opportunity to kill anyone.

This is why I always reject the premise that once put away for life the safety of the public is a certainty. Although infrequent, they do escape. This was without even needing some type of catastrophe or attack on the prison to spring them loose.
After 16 days on the run, the escaped killers could be anywhere. But authorities are honing in on a rural "hot spot" in southwestern New York.

The latest possible sighting of fugitives Richard Matt, 48, and David Sweat, 35, came in Allegany County, just north of the Pennsylvania border. That's where a witness reported seeing two men along a railroad line Saturday in the town of Friendship, New York State Police said.

While state police called the report an "unconfirmed sighting," a law enforcement source briefed on the prisoner investigation told CNN there was a credible sighting of Matt and Sweat near Friendship.

The Allegany County Sheriff's Office said a tipster led investigators to a set of tracks in the area. Authorities were following the tracks to try to determine whether they're from the two escapees.

If Matt and Sweat were indeed in Friendship, that means they somehow traveled more than 300 miles southwest of Dannemora, New York, where they had escaped from the Clinton Correctional Facility.
http://www.cnn.com/2015/06/21/us/new-yo ... index.html

Executed prisoners never escape and kill again.

User avatar
Moliere
Posts: 12007
Joined: Sun Sep 03, 2006 10:57 am
Location: Walking through a desert land

Re: Death Penalty

Post by Moliere » Sun Jun 21, 2015 6:13 pm

Rip wrote:Executed prisoners never escape and kill again.
330 exonerations probably disagree with you.
"The world is suffering more today from the good people who want to mind other men's business than it is from the bad people who are willing to let everybody look after their own individual affairs." - Clarence Darrow

User avatar
Rip
Posts: 26878
Joined: Tue Oct 12, 2004 9:34 pm
Location: Cajun Country!
Contact:
Rip’s avatar
Online

Re: Death Penalty

Post by Rip » Sun Jun 21, 2015 6:17 pm

Moliere wrote:
Rip wrote:Executed prisoners never escape and kill again.
330 exonerations probably disagree with you.
How is that? They aren't executed. They apparently never killed the first time, and I would hope they aren't now out there trying to kill albeit not again.

User avatar
Jaymann
Posts: 8488
Joined: Mon Oct 25, 2004 7:13 pm
Location: California

Re: Death Penalty

Post by Jaymann » Sun Jun 21, 2015 7:37 pm

So if you are convicted of murder, serve your time and are released, and the victim turns up alive, do you have the right to kill them?
Jaymann
]==(:::::::::::::>

User avatar
Unagi
Posts: 17158
Joined: Wed Sep 20, 2006 5:14 pm
Location: Chicago

Re: Death Penalty

Post by Unagi » Sun Jun 21, 2015 7:58 pm

Jaymann wrote:So if you are convicted of murder, serve your time and are released, and the victim turns up alive, do you have the right to kill them?
Or really, do you have the right to kill them, time served.

User avatar
Rip
Posts: 26878
Joined: Tue Oct 12, 2004 9:34 pm
Location: Cajun Country!
Contact:
Rip’s avatar
Online

Re: Death Penalty

Post by Rip » Sun Jun 21, 2015 8:08 pm

Absolutely, if someone stood by and watched someone get convicted of their murder they deserve it.

User avatar
Isgrimnur
Posts: 59833
Joined: Sun Oct 15, 2006 12:29 am
Location: Dallas, TX
Contact:
Isgrimnur’s avatar
Online

Re: Death Penalty

Post by Isgrimnur » Wed Sep 02, 2015 10:44 am

Moliere wrote:2 Brothers Pardoned, Clearing Way for Them to Receive $750K
When DNA evidence freed two brothers wrongfully imprisoned for an 11-year-old girl's killing, each was given $45 by prison officials.

Nine months later, pardons issued Thursday by North Carolina's governor have cleared the way for Henry McCollum and Leon Brown to receive $750,000 each from the state for spending three decades in prison. It's been a long wait for the men who have been relying on help from family and donations while their application was pending.

The brothers' family, friends and attorneys were jubilant in early September after a judge vacated their convictions and ordered their release, citing new DNA evidence that points to another man killing and raping 11-year-old Sabrina Buie in 1983.
Thirty years on Death Row because of a coerced confession and zero physical evidence. :cry:

Eventually...
On Wednesday, Deputy Commissioner J. Brad Donovan of the North Carolina Industrial Commission awarded Henry McCollum and his half brother Leon Brown $750,000 each for their wrongful conviction and imprisonment for 30 years.

Donovan says the funds will be available after a period of 15 days. That is required in case the state appeals. The state treasury can then disburse the money.

Marc Snead of the state Department of Justice says the state agrees the men should get the money.
...
An attorney for the men says McCollum plan[ned] to attend the hearing along with his sister. However, Brown has been hospitalized for mental health issues exacerbated by his time in prison.

McCollum had been the longest-serving inmate on North Carolina's death row before the pair was released last year.
Silver - 1k

User avatar
Moliere
Posts: 12007
Joined: Sun Sep 03, 2006 10:57 am
Location: Walking through a desert land

Re: Death Penalty

Post by Moliere » Thu Mar 03, 2016 10:39 am

Utah Senate narrowly votes to abolish death penalty
A year ago, Utah lawmakers were expanding the ways the state could execute inmates condemned to death. This week, the state took a major step toward possibly abolishing the death penalty entirely.

The Utah state Senate narrowly voted on Wednesday to approve a bill that scraps the death penalty, with 15 state senators — the minimum number needed for passage — voting to send it to the state’s House of Representatives.
"The world is suffering more today from the good people who want to mind other men's business than it is from the bad people who are willing to let everybody look after their own individual affairs." - Clarence Darrow

User avatar
Moliere
Posts: 12007
Joined: Sun Sep 03, 2006 10:57 am
Location: Walking through a desert land

Re: Death Penalty

Post by Moliere » Thu Apr 20, 2017 10:17 pm

Arkansas is now hours from executing a man despite the fact that:
1. His trial judge was sleeping with the prosecutor.
2. His habeas attorney was an alcoholic who once showed up for a hearing drunk.
3. He was convicted in part by a method of hair fiber analysis that even the FBI now says is dubious.
4. There is DNA testing that could either cast doubt on or affirm his guilt. Yet the state refuses to test it. And the courts refuse to order it.
And why is Arkansas in such a rush to kill him? Because the state's execution drugs -- which it obtained illegally -- are about to expire.
"The world is suffering more today from the good people who want to mind other men's business than it is from the bad people who are willing to let everybody look after their own individual affairs." - Clarence Darrow

User avatar
Isgrimnur
Posts: 59833
Joined: Sun Oct 15, 2006 12:29 am
Location: Dallas, TX
Contact:
Isgrimnur’s avatar
Online

Re: Death Penalty

Post by Isgrimnur » Fri Apr 21, 2017 2:07 pm

WaPo
Supreme Court Justice Neil M. Gorsuch cast his first consequential vote Thursday night, siding with the court’s other four conservatives in denying a stay request from Arkansas death row inmates facing execution.
...
Gorsuch’s reasoning for his vote in not known. Neither he nor the other justices who turned down the request explained the decision. But Gorsuch was sworn in on April 10, and he has had some time to study Arkansas’ well-publicized attempt to execute several inmates before a drug used in their planned lethal injections expires.
...
Gorsuch has rejected stay-of-execution requests as a member of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 10th Circuit, but he has had limited exposure to the issue of capital punishment.
Silver - 1k

User avatar
Isgrimnur
Posts: 59833
Joined: Sun Oct 15, 2006 12:29 am
Location: Dallas, TX
Contact:
Isgrimnur’s avatar
Online

Re: Death Penalty

Post by Isgrimnur » Fri Feb 23, 2018 9:26 pm

Texas
Whole article wrote:Texas Gov. Greg Abbott has accepted the state parole board’s recommendation and is sparing the life of convicted killer Thomas “Bart” Whitaker.

The 38-year-old Whitaker was set for execution Thursday evening for masterminding a murder plot that took the lives of his mother and younger brother at the family home in suburban Houston in 2003. His father also was wounded in the shootings and has favored clemency for his son, saying he’s forgiven him.

The seven-member parole board Tuesday unanimously recommended Whitaker’s death sentence be reduced.

Prosecutors who convinced a jury to send him to death row said the parole board’s decision was wrong and negated the jurors’ verdict.

It’s the first time in more than a decade that a Texas governor has halted an imminent execution.
Silver - 1k

User avatar
Isgrimnur
Posts: 59833
Joined: Sun Oct 15, 2006 12:29 am
Location: Dallas, TX
Contact:
Isgrimnur’s avatar
Online

Re: Death Penalty

Post by Isgrimnur » Fri Feb 23, 2018 9:29 pm

NPR
If the death sentences in Alabama, Texas and Florida had all gone ahead on Thursday night as originally planned, it would have marked the first time in eight years that three convicted killers were executed on the same day.
...
And late Thursday, the execution in Alabama of Doyle Lee Hamm was postponed after last minute legal wrangling pushed late into the evening.

Only the execution of Florida inmate Eric Scott Branch, 47, who was convicted of raping and killing a college student decades ago, was carried out.
...
Abbott agreed with the board and granted his first commutation of a death sentence as governor, after allowing 30 others to be carried out.

"The murders of Mr. Whitaker's mother and brother are reprehensible," Abbott said in a prepared statement. "The crime deserves severe punishment for the criminals who killed them. The recommendation of the Texas Board of Pardons and Paroles, and my action on it, ensures Mr. Whitaker will never be released from prison."

In Alabama, Hamm's execution was unable to begin before a midnight deadline on his death warrant expired.

Appeals for Hamm, 61, who was convicted of killing a hotel clerk in 1987, have revolved around whether the inmate's cancer "had left him healthy enough to be executed without excessive suffering," according to AL.com.
Silver - 1k

User avatar
Isgrimnur
Posts: 59833
Joined: Sun Oct 15, 2006 12:29 am
Location: Dallas, TX
Contact:
Isgrimnur’s avatar
Online

Re: Death Penalty

Post by Isgrimnur » Fri Aug 03, 2018 11:47 am

NYT
When Nebraska lawmakers defied Gov. Pete Ricketts in 2015 by repealing the death penalty over his strong objections, the governor wouldn’t let the matter go. Mr. Ricketts, a Republican who is Roman Catholic, tapped his family fortune to help bankroll a referendum to reinstate capital punishment, a measure the state’s Catholic leadership vehemently opposed.

After a contentious and emotional battle across this deep-red state, voters restored the death penalty the following year. Later this month, Nebraska is scheduled to execute Carey Dean Moore, who was convicted of murder, in what would be the state’s first execution in 21 years.

The prospect has renewed a tense debate in a state with strong Christian traditions that has wrestled with the moral and financial implications of the death penalty for years, even before the 2015 attempt to abolish it. Protesters have been holding daily vigils outside the governor’s mansion to oppose Mr. Moore’s execution.

Complicating matters, Pope Francis this week declared that executions are unacceptable in all cases, a shift from earlier church doctrine that had accepted the death penalty if it was “the only practicable way” to defend lives. Coming only days before the scheduled Aug. 14 execution here, the pope’s stance seemed to create an awkward position for Mr. Ricketts, who is favored to win a bid for re-election this fall.

Mr. Ricketts, who in the past has said that he viewed his position on the death penalty as compatible with Catholicism, on Thursday issued a statement about the pope’s declaration.

“While I respect the pope’s perspective, capital punishment remains the will of the people and the law of the state of Nebraska,” Mr. Ricketts’s statement said. “It is an important tool to protect our corrections officers and public safety. The state continues to carry out the sentences ordered by the court.”
Silver - 1k

User avatar
Isgrimnur
Posts: 59833
Joined: Sun Oct 15, 2006 12:29 am
Location: Dallas, TX
Contact:
Isgrimnur’s avatar
Online

Re: Death Penalty

Post by Isgrimnur » Thu Oct 11, 2018 4:21 pm

Washington
The Washington state Supreme Court on Thursday unanimously struck down the death penalty there as unconstitutional and “racially biased,” a ruling that makes it the latest in a string of states to abandon capital punishment in recent years.

The order will not stop any scheduled executions because Washington state has already frozen its death penalty under a moratorium by Gov. Jay Inslee (D) in 2014. But the court’s order, which declares that death sentences in the state should be converted to life in prison, is a sweeping rejection of capital punishment at a time when it is being used less nationwide and as states are struggling to obtain the drugs needed for lethal injections.

In their opinion, the justices focused on what they said was the unequal use of the death penalty, describing it as a punishment meted out haphazardly depending on little more than geography or timing.
...
The opinion in Washington was issued in a case that has lingered in the criminal justice system for more than two decades, centering on a man sentenced to death for the rape and murder of Geneine Harshfield in July 1996.

Allen Eugene Gregory, who was convicted of Harshfield’s death, is one of eight people on Washington’s death row; five of those people are white and three, like Gregory, are black. Gregory, 46, was first convicted and sentenced in 2001 and then, after his case was overturned, convicted and sentenced again in 2012.
Silver - 1k

User avatar
Isgrimnur
Posts: 59833
Joined: Sun Oct 15, 2006 12:29 am
Location: Dallas, TX
Contact:
Isgrimnur’s avatar
Online

Re: Death Penalty

Post by Isgrimnur » Wed Feb 20, 2019 11:46 am

https://www.washingtonpost.com/politics ... story.html
For the second time in as many weeks, Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr. has sided with liberal Supreme Court justices to disagree with how lower courts have interpreted Supreme Court precedent.

On Tuesday, Roberts was pointed in saying the Texas Court of Criminal Appeals has “misapplied” a 2017 ruling that instructed that court to reconsider its analysis of whether death-row inmate Bobby James Moore was intellectually disabled, and thus ineligible for execution.
...
Roberts’s role in the abortion and death penalty cases were notable partly because he had been in dissent in the original decisions. His actions are not a sign that he has changed his mind; the ruling that the Louisiana law could not go into effect at this time was not a decision on the merits.

But they do seem to be an indication the chief justice believes lower courts must comply with Supreme Court precedents so long as they stand.

“On remand, the court repeated the same errors that this court previously condemned,” Roberts wrote, concurring in the majority’s finding Tuesday that Moore, the inmate, “is a person with intellectual disability.”

The Texas court’s review of Moore’s case “did not pass muster under this court’s analysis last time,” Roberts wrote in a separate opinion. “It still doesn’t.”

The court, in an unsigned opinion, said the Texas court was wrong to reaffirm that Moore was mentally capable and eligible for execution. Three of the court’s conservatives — Justices Thomas, Samuel A. Alito Jr. and Neil M. Gorsuch — noted their disagreement in a dissent written by Alito.

He said the court’s instructions in the 2015 ruling on Moore were so gauzy it is no surprise that the Texas court had trouble following them. The proper response, he said, would have been to return the case with more specific instructions, not to take the decision away.

“The court’s foray into fact-finding is an unsound departure from our usual practice,” Alito wrote.

In a 5-to-3 decision written in 2017 by Ginsburg, the court sent back the case of Moore, who fatally shot store clerk James McCardle in a botched robbery in 1980. Moore’s decades-long trip through the appeals courts has been marked by conflicting opinions on whether he is intellectually disabled.

Texas’s Court of Criminal Appeals eventually determined he was not. But the Supreme Court concluded that this decision improperly relied on outdated medical standards, borderline IQ scores and a list of unique-to-Texas factors that Ginsburg termed an “invention . . . untied to any acknowledged source.”

On remand, the Texas court once again considered Moore’s intellectual abilities, and again found him competent.

But on Tuesday, the Supreme Court majority was unimpressed:

“We have found in its opinion too many instances in which, with small variations, it repeats the analysis we previously found wanting, and these same parts are critical to its ultimate conclusion.”
Silver - 1k

User avatar
Isgrimnur
Posts: 59833
Joined: Sun Oct 15, 2006 12:29 am
Location: Dallas, TX
Contact:
Isgrimnur’s avatar
Online

Re: Death Penalty

Post by Isgrimnur » Wed Mar 13, 2019 4:35 pm

California
Gov. Gavin Newsom signed an an executive order Wednesday granting reprieves to all 737 Californians awaiting executions, saying the death penalty is “ineffective, irreversible and immoral.”
Silver - 1k

User avatar
Jaymann
Posts: 8488
Joined: Mon Oct 25, 2004 7:13 pm
Location: California

Re: Death Penalty

Post by Jaymann » Wed Mar 13, 2019 4:54 pm

the more I hear about Newsom the more I like.
Jaymann
]==(:::::::::::::>

User avatar
Holman
Posts: 20727
Joined: Sun Oct 24, 2004 8:00 pm
Location: Approximately Wissahickon

Re: Death Penalty

Post by Holman » Wed Mar 13, 2019 5:04 pm

Isgrimnur wrote:
Wed Mar 13, 2019 4:35 pm
The confident assertion that every single person on death row is a "stone cold killer" is the problem right there.

It's half ignorance of systemic problems and half sick hard-on for killing prisoners.
Much prefer my Nazis Nuremberged.

User avatar
GreenGoo
Posts: 40436
Joined: Thu Oct 14, 2004 10:46 pm
Location: Ottawa, ON

Re: Death Penalty

Post by GreenGoo » Wed Mar 13, 2019 5:44 pm

If there's one thing society ignores these days, it's the victims. No where in the history of humanity have victims been so little thought of, compensated, cared for than right now.

If Drumpf is really concerned about the victims, just pass a law to set everyone free and give the costs associated with killing a death row inmate to the victim's family. How's that work for ya, mr. won't someone think of the victims and kill these people already?

The real crime is halting state sanctioned murder. That's the real victim here.

User avatar
Isgrimnur
Posts: 59833
Joined: Sun Oct 15, 2006 12:29 am
Location: Dallas, TX
Contact:
Isgrimnur’s avatar
Online

Re: Death Penalty

Post by Isgrimnur » Mon Apr 01, 2019 3:52 pm

WaPo
A divided Supreme Court said Monday that a Missouri death row inmate had not shown that a rare medical condition would render his execution by injection cruel and unusual punishment, though dissenters said he could choke on his own blood during the procedure.

The court ruled 5 to 4 that Russell Bucklew, convicted 22 years ago for murder, failed to show that his suffering would be exceptional and that he had not identified another manner of execution that would be better.

“The Eighth Amendment has never been understood to guarantee a condemned inmate a painless death,” Justice Neil M. Gorsuch said in announcing the decision from the bench. “That’s a luxury not guaranteed to many people, including most victims of capital crimes.
...
Missouri plans to use an injection of a single drug, pentobarbital, to carry out the execution of Bucklew. But he suffers from a congenital and rare disease called cavernous hemangioma. It causes blood-filled tumors to grow in his head, neck and throat, which his attorneys say could rupture during the state’s lethal injection process.
Silver - 1k

Post Reply