Amazon has whacked our affiliate account. Hosting Donations/Commitments $2063 of $1920 (Sept 13/18). In Hand $1466 (Lump sum payments minus paypal graft). Paypal Donation Link Here

All things: China

For discussion of religion and politics

Moderators: LawBeefaroni, $iljanus

User avatar
Victoria Raverna
Posts: 3594
Joined: Fri Oct 15, 2004 2:23 am
Location: Jakarta

Re: All things: China

Post by Victoria Raverna » Wed Jan 16, 2019 1:27 am

Max Peck wrote:
Tue Jan 15, 2019 11:11 pm
Victoria Raverna wrote:
Tue Jan 15, 2019 4:51 am
You don't want other countries to interfere or force your country to do something like freeing Meng but you want to interfere with China's justice.
So you are saying that China is trying to "force" Canada to free Meng by changing Schellenberg's sentence from imprisonment to death following the one-day show trial? And you're equating that action to Canada's reaction, which is a statement to the effect that they believe the new sentence is a transparent ploy to pressure Canada into dropping the charges against Meng?

That is some Trumpian whataboutism you're tossing about. :coffee:
No. I am not saying that. The death sentence might not have anything to do with Meng case since China has executed drug traffickers before so this is not a special case. It is not as if China's court is sentencing a Canadian shoplifter to death penalty.

For me it is not fair to decide without any proof that when China arrested Canadians or sentence Canadians, it is a payback or to force Canada to free Meng. But when Poland arrest a Huawei staff, it is proof that China or Huawei is bad and spying.

It is possible the Huawei staff in Poland was spying. It is also possible the Canadians in China did the same.

It is also the same with the death sentence. It is possible it is related to Meng's case. It is also possible it is not. It is possible the reason for inviting reporters to cover the trial is to let drug traffickers know that China is strict on drug trafficking.

User avatar
GreenGoo
Posts: 40569
Joined: Thu Oct 14, 2004 10:46 pm
Location: Ottawa, ON

Re: All things: China

Post by GreenGoo » Wed Jan 16, 2019 3:10 am

It's possible aliens are pitting us against each other in a televised reality tv show.

That things are possible doesn't make all of them equally likely, and I'm not a huge fan of coincidences. Particularly multiple coincidences in a row. Particularly when China vowed to retaliate for Meng's arrest. Particularly when they then retaliated.

Throwing doubt on the truth is how the bad guys win. Drumpf's a bad guy. You're a bad guy. Smarten up. Don't do their dirty work for them.

At least 13 Canadians had been "detained" since Meng was arrested. 8 have been released, so I guess there's nothing to see here. Tell me again that this is not an attempt to intimidate and warn our government. Go ahead, I dare you.

User avatar
Victoria Raverna
Posts: 3594
Joined: Fri Oct 15, 2004 2:23 am
Location: Jakarta

Re: All things: China

Post by Victoria Raverna » Thu Jan 17, 2019 12:19 am

Seem like Meng's arrest is also a bargaining chip for US in the trade war with China.

https://www.vanityfair.com/news/2018/12 ... rest-trump

And then Donald Trump opened his mouth. Speaking to Reuters, the man who is somehow president of the United States, despite a debilitating condition that causes persistent word vomit, said he would absolutely intervene in the Meng situation if it meant Beijing would give him what he wants on trade. “If I think it’s good for the country, if I think it’s good for what will be certainly the largest trade deal ever made—which is a very important thing—what’s good for national security—I would certainly intervene if I thought it was necessary,” Trump said Tuesday. In other words, he would happily use the power of the presidency to free Meng, if doing so will allow him to tweet that he negotiated “THE BIGGEST TRADE DEAL EVER.”

User avatar
GreenGoo
Posts: 40569
Joined: Thu Oct 14, 2004 10:46 pm
Location: Ottawa, ON

Re: All things: China

Post by GreenGoo » Thu Jan 17, 2019 12:23 am

Then China should be fucking arresting and killing Americans.

Again, China are complete cowards.

With that said, Drumpf has said lots of stupid stuff, including a number of other times that he had suggested American justice is flexible to his whims.

I would take everything drumpf with a grain of salt. A very large grain of salt.

Talking about stupid people, the arrest warrant for Meng was issued in August. She was specifically avoiding entering US territory. Is China not aware of the relationship between the US and Canada? Or is she stupid? Or is she that arrogant? Honestly, what possible reason could she have to think that she wasn't in danger of arrest when she landed in Canada? Because she owns property here? Geezus.

User avatar
GreenGoo
Posts: 40569
Joined: Thu Oct 14, 2004 10:46 pm
Location: Ottawa, ON

Re: All things: China

Post by GreenGoo » Thu Jan 17, 2019 7:28 pm

Chinese ambassador threatening "repercussions" if Huawei banned from Canada's 5G networks.

The US, Australia and the UK all have unofficial bans in place already.

Take a wild guess why those countries have banned their products. Keep using our compromised devices or face "repercussions". Yeah, that'll work.

Kick the ambassador out. They can try again with someone else when they learn that they are guests and threatening their host is bad manners.

User avatar
Max Peck
Posts: 7553
Joined: Fri Aug 05, 2005 8:09 pm
Location: Down the Rabbit-Hole

Re: All things: China

Post by Max Peck » Thu Jan 17, 2019 7:44 pm

No Exit: China’s Growing Use of Exit Bans Violates International Law
In November last year, the New York Times broke the sad story of Victor and Cynthia Liu, American citizens who entered China in June 2018, and have since been barred from leaving the country. Although they have not been detained, they are being blocked from leaving China under a so-called “exit ban,” a tool increasingly used by Chinese authorities to increase leverage over individuals accused of wrongdoing, or who merely have found themselves on the wrong side of a business dispute.

Their case is part of an emerging—and quite troubling—pattern of official Chinese efforts to use foreign nationals as bargaining chips in disputes with other parties, including private individuals, overseas companies, or even other countries.
Foreign governments, particularly the United States, should take note: More and more often, Beijing has proved willing to use foreign nationals as bargaining chips, or to otherwise disregard the rights of foreign nationals when politically expedient. In December, Canadian nationals Michael Kovrig and Michael Spavor were detained by Chinese authorities. They have yet to be formally charged with any crime. Their detentions almost certainly were directly linked to a Canadian court’s decision to detain Huawei executive Meng Wanzhou in response to a U.S. extradition request. In other cases, mostly involving naturalized foreign citizens of Chinese descent detained in China, Chinese officials have refused to allow for consular notification and visitation, as required under international law.

As this piece was going to press, China dramatically escalated its use of foreign nationals as political pawns. On January 14, a court in Dalian, China, sentenced Canadian national Robert Schellenberg to death for drug smuggling. As Don Clarke has written elsewhere on Lawfare, the handling of Schellenberg’s case was dramatically accelerated after Meng Wanzhou’s detention in Vancouver, suggesting that the two cases are linked: Beijing may be seeking to use the prospect of Schellenberg’s execution to increase the pressure on Ottawa to free Meng.
Time and tide melt the snowman.

There are worlds out there where the sky is burning, where the sea's asleep and the rivers dream, people made of smoke and cities made of song. Somewhere there's danger, somewhere there's injustice and somewhere else the tea is getting cold. Come on, Ace, we've got work to do.
-- The Doctor

User avatar
GreenGoo
Posts: 40569
Joined: Thu Oct 14, 2004 10:46 pm
Location: Ottawa, ON

Re: All things: China

Post by GreenGoo » Sat Jan 19, 2019 1:06 pm

America seems to be taking it's time filing extradition paperwork.

Fantastic.

User avatar
GreenGoo
Posts: 40569
Joined: Thu Oct 14, 2004 10:46 pm
Location: Ottawa, ON

Re: All things: China

Post by GreenGoo » Tue Jan 22, 2019 5:42 pm

Shocking no one, now that America has finally publicly committed to follow through with extradition proceedings re: Meng, China has started to (softly) lump the US in with Canada in their criticisms.

I believe the last thing I read was that the US and Canada was using their extradition something something unfairly.

I look forward to handing her off the the US and having China stfu about Canada. I have no illusions that it will mean anything positive for those being held in China however.

User avatar
Isgrimnur
Posts: 60120
Joined: Sun Oct 15, 2006 12:29 am
Location: Dallas, TX
Contact:

Re: All things: China

Post by Isgrimnur » Wed Jan 23, 2019 1:19 pm

You can add the Australians
The Australian government said Wednesday it is seeking information about why China is holding one of its citizens, writer Yang Hengjun, whose friends say is probably in the custody of state security officials.

The case of Yang, a prominent novelist and former Chinese official who gave up his nationality and emigrated to Australia, could represent a fresh instance of China detaining a citizen of a country allied with the United States amid a globe-spanning standoff.
...
The Australian Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade said Chinese authorities told them Yang is being held in Beijing, without giving additional details. “The department is seeking to clarify the nature of this detention and to obtain consular access to him,” the department said Wednesday.

Two friends of Yang, U.S.-based publisher Shi Wei and Feng Chongyi, a professor at the University of Technology Sydney, told The Washington Post that the writer took off from New York on a China Southern Airlines flight for Guangzhou but fell out of touch after he landed early Saturday.

Yang’s wife, Yuan Ruijun, who was traveling with him and their two children, told friends that she was questioned in Guangzhou and that her husband was detained by state security, according to Feng.

Yuan later also fell out of contact, but not before she sent friends a picture of the Beijing airport without explanation on Sunday. The picture signaled that she felt compelled to travel to the Chinese capital but was not at liberty to say why, Feng said.
Silver - 1k

User avatar
NickAragua
Posts: 4356
Joined: Mon Feb 23, 2009 5:20 pm
Location: Boston, MA

Re: All things: China

Post by NickAragua » Wed Jan 23, 2019 1:26 pm

BTW, just to put things in perspective, China is going to be the creepiest goddamn places on the planet, and frankly makes my skin crawl.

Social credit scores.

Smartphone app that lets you know when someone nearby is in debt.

Combine this creepy big brother bullshit with a "classic" dictatorship and... ugh.

User avatar
Max Peck
Posts: 7553
Joined: Fri Aug 05, 2005 8:09 pm
Location: Down the Rabbit-Hole

Re: All things: China

Post by Max Peck » Wed Jan 23, 2019 5:13 pm

Huawei executive has strong case against extradition: Canadian envoy
A top executive from Huawei Technologies Co Ltd [HWT.UL] being held in Canada can make “strong arguments” against extradition to the United States, in part due to President Donald Trump’s politicization of the case, Canada’s ambassador to China said.

Canadian envoy John McCallum’s comments to Chinese-language media, which were broadcast on Wednesday, are the most explicit sign yet from a Canadian official that Meng Wanzhou, Huawei’s chief financial officer, may not be sent to the United States.
Time and tide melt the snowman.

There are worlds out there where the sky is burning, where the sea's asleep and the rivers dream, people made of smoke and cities made of song. Somewhere there's danger, somewhere there's injustice and somewhere else the tea is getting cold. Come on, Ace, we've got work to do.
-- The Doctor

User avatar
GreenGoo
Posts: 40569
Joined: Thu Oct 14, 2004 10:46 pm
Location: Ottawa, ON

Re: All things: China

Post by GreenGoo » Wed Jan 23, 2019 6:22 pm

Yeah.

Awesome.

User avatar
GreenGoo
Posts: 40569
Joined: Thu Oct 14, 2004 10:46 pm
Location: Ottawa, ON

Re: All things: China

Post by GreenGoo » Sat Jan 26, 2019 5:25 pm

Max Peck wrote:
Wed Jan 23, 2019 5:13 pm
Huawei executive has strong case against extradition: Canadian envoy
A top executive from Huawei Technologies Co Ltd [HWT.UL] being held in Canada can make “strong arguments” against extradition to the United States, in part due to President Donald Trump’s politicization of the case, Canada’s ambassador to China said.

Canadian envoy John McCallum’s comments to Chinese-language media, which were broadcast on Wednesday, are the most explicit sign yet from a Canadian official that Meng Wanzhou, Huawei’s chief financial officer, may not be sent to the United States.
Fired following another diplomatic misstep. Both comments were in China's interests and not in Canada's interests. Very strange.

User avatar
Isgrimnur
Posts: 60120
Joined: Sun Oct 15, 2006 12:29 am
Location: Dallas, TX
Contact:

Re: All things: China

Post by Isgrimnur » Tue Jan 29, 2019 1:17 pm

WaPo
The Justice Department announced criminal charges Monday against Huawei Technologies, the world’s largest communications equipment manufacturer, and one of its top executives — a move likely to intensify trade tensions between the United States and China.

A 13-count indictment filed in New York City against Huawei, two affiliates and its chief financial officer, Meng Wanzhou, details allegations of bank and wire fraud. The company also is charged with violating U.S. sanctions on Iran and conspiring to obstruct justice related to the investigation.
...
On Monday evening, the Canadian Justice Department confirmed it had received a formal request for Meng’s extradition from the United States to stand trial. The request comes even as Beijing has pressured Canada to release Meng.

Top U.S. law enforcement officials, including acting attorney general Matthew G. Whitaker and FBI Director Christopher A. Wray, held a news conference in Washington to announce the charges.

“The criminal activity in this indictment goes back 10 years and goes all the way to the top of the company,” Whitaker said.
...
The indictment threatened to further strain relations between Washington and Beijing as officials from both countries prepare for talks this week aimed at ending a months-long economic impasse that has contributed to huge swings in the stock market. Although President Trump had suggested he was willing to help secure Meng’s release if China met his demands for a trade deal, Justice and Commerce department officials insisted Meng’s criminal case was a separate matter.

Prosecutors said that Huawei — and Meng in particular — lied to banking authorities to avoid questions about whether the company evaded U.S. sanctions prohibiting firms from doing business with Iran. The indictment alleges that Huawei’s misrepresentations to the U.S. government and various banks about its business dealings in Iran date back to 2007.
Silver - 1k

User avatar
Isgrimnur
Posts: 60120
Joined: Sun Oct 15, 2006 12:29 am
Location: Dallas, TX
Contact:

Re: All things: China

Post by Isgrimnur » Fri Feb 01, 2019 1:01 pm

CBC
NATO's chief weighed in Thursday on the diplomatic spat between China and Canada, calling on Chinese officials to treat two Canadians detained in the country "fairly and with due process."

In his first public comments about the case, Secretary General Jens Stoltenberg said he was following their case "with concern" and urged Beijing to address the concerns of the Canadian government, which wants the pair to be "immediately released."
Silver - 1k

User avatar
Isgrimnur
Posts: 60120
Joined: Sun Oct 15, 2006 12:29 am
Location: Dallas, TX
Contact:

Re: All things: China

Post by Isgrimnur » Thu Feb 07, 2019 5:51 pm

WaPo
Uighurs in Adelaide said efforts to infiltrate their community go back more than a decade. One man, who spoke on the condition of anonymity because he still has family in China, said that during a visit to China in 2005, he was offered what was then an average wage in Australia if he agreed to spy on his community. Another woman, who also spoke on the condition of anonymity to protect her family, said she was approached with a similar request as recently as 2011.

Open intimidation on Australian soil is a much more recent concern. It has taken the form of WeChat messages or phone calls, often from individuals claiming to be Chinese officials. They may ask for a call back regarding passport or visa matters, or claim a package has arrived at the embassy for the person they are calling; many of them demand sensitive personal information that Uighurs believe Chinese authorities would already have because of prior visa requests.

That pattern, said Michael Clarke, who researches the treatment of Uighurs at Australia’s National Security College, is “consistent, not just with incidents in Australia, but also in other places around the world.”

Some researchers caution that there is no statistical evidence of such tactics, but Uighur community leaders say complaints about calls, messages and video chats have proliferated as Adelaide’s Uighurs have become more politically active over the last two years. Uighurs say the calls began in March, just hours after the community staged its largest-ever protest in Canberra, Australia’s capital, to highlight the plight of China’s Uighurs.
...
China is Australia’s biggest export market, putting Canberra in an awkward position. Australia’s government is a vocal critic of the treatment of Uighurs; it joined the United States as recently as November in calling on China to close its camps. But Nurmuhammad Said Majid, the president of the East Turkistan Australian Association (“East Turkistan” is the term used by Uighurs to describe Xinjiang), believes that Australia’s increasing dependence on China has made it made it more difficult for his community to have their complaints heard.
Silver - 1k

User avatar
Isgrimnur
Posts: 60120
Joined: Sun Oct 15, 2006 12:29 am
Location: Dallas, TX
Contact:

Re: All things: China

Post by Isgrimnur » Fri Mar 01, 2019 4:42 pm

WaPo
Canada will move ahead with the extradition case against Chinese technology executive Meng Wanzhou, paving the way for a legal battle that will pit Canada against China and could complicate the relationship between both countries and the United States.

The decision, which was announced Friday, means Canada’s Justice Department believes there is “sufficient evidence” to proceed with an extradition hearing. Meng will next appear in a Vancouver court on March 6, when next steps for the hearing will be set.
Silver - 1k

User avatar
Jaymann
Posts: 8535
Joined: Mon Oct 25, 2004 7:13 pm
Location: California

Re: All things: China

Post by Jaymann » Fri Mar 01, 2019 4:45 pm

Wait a minute, why do they need to extradite if he is already in Canada?
Jaymann
]==(:::::::::::::>

User avatar
Isgrimnur
Posts: 60120
Joined: Sun Oct 15, 2006 12:29 am
Location: Dallas, TX
Contact:

Re: All things: China

Post by Isgrimnur » Fri Mar 01, 2019 4:47 pm

She is being extradited to the US.
Silver - 1k

User avatar
Isgrimnur
Posts: 60120
Joined: Sun Oct 15, 2006 12:29 am
Location: Dallas, TX
Contact:

Re: All things: China

Post by Isgrimnur » Mon Mar 04, 2019 3:19 pm

CNN
The case against the two Canadians detained in the wake of the controversial arrest of a Huawei executive was revealed by China's Central Political and Legal Affairs Commission on Monday.

In a statement described as a "major development" in the case, former diplomat Michael Kovrig was accused of gathering and stealing "sensitive information and other intelligence" in China since 2017.

Businessman Michael Spavor is accused of providing intelligence to Kovrig, and is described as an "important contact" for the former diplomat.
...
Monday's announcement came just two days before Meng is due to face an extradition hearing in Canadian court. The Huawei executive could be sent to the US to face charges over breaking Iran sanctions.
Silver - 1k

User avatar
LordMortis
Posts: 60570
Joined: Tue Oct 12, 2004 11:26 pm

Re: All things: China

Post by LordMortis » Tue Mar 19, 2019 3:36 pm

In an interesting twist, while we (the US) are putting Tariffs on Chinese distribution like mad concurrent with an ill thought out "domestic" corporate give away, China are about to reduce their VAT.

https://www.china-briefing.com/news/vat ... ered-2019/

According to Li, China’s VAT rates will change as follows:

The 16 percent VAT rate, which applies to the manufacturing sector, will be lowered to 13 percent;
The 10 percent rate, which applies to construction and transport, will be lowered to nine percent; and
The six percent rate, which applies to services, will remain the same, but more deductions for the bracket will be introduced.
Will be interesting to see if this is a win for the Trump regime or if it will be sold as a win for the Trump regime in spite of not having an effect or if the 16% to 13% on imports will benefit all of the other countries (Russia) who have been filling in US exports to China. :pop:

No matter which way (or ways) it's coming from China's economy continues to slow and they're acting and are also beginning to fear their own ability to create national debt.

http://www.usdebtclock.org/world-debt-clock.html

User avatar
Isgrimnur
Posts: 60120
Joined: Sun Oct 15, 2006 12:29 am
Location: Dallas, TX
Contact:

Re: All things: China

Post by Isgrimnur » Wed Mar 27, 2019 11:00 am

NPR
Meng Hongwei — who was the president of Interpol when he was reported missing in China last fall — has been expelled from the Communist Party of China and will be prosecuted on bribery charges.

Meng's case drew international headlines last fall, after one of the world's top law enforcement officials suddenly lost contact with his family during a trip to China from Lyon, France, where he had been living with his family near Interpol's headquarters.

Meng's wife reported him missing; she later received an alarming text on her phone, showing a knife emoji. Interpol also sought answers — and eventually received notice that Meng had resigned midway through his four-year term. Soon afterwards, Chinese officials said they had detained Meng on suspicions of bribery.

"According to Chinese authorities, Meng used his position to seek employment for his wife and connived to use his authority for personal gain," NPR's Rob Schmitz reports from Shanghai for our Newscast unit. "Meng's wife, Grace Meng, says she asked French President Emmanuel Macron to discuss her husband's case ahead of Chinese leader Xi Jinping's visit to Paris this week. She's currently in France and has applied for asylum there, because she fears for her life."

In addition to his prominent and groundbreaking Interpol post — he was the first Chinese official to hold the position — Meng also served as China's vice minister of public security. He's now stripped of that role, which he had gained under Zhou Yongkang, the former security czar who is now serving life in prison on bribery charges, snared in President Xi's anti-corruption campaign.
Silver - 1k

User avatar
Isgrimnur
Posts: 60120
Joined: Sun Oct 15, 2006 12:29 am
Location: Dallas, TX
Contact:

Re: All things: China

Post by Isgrimnur » Mon May 20, 2019 9:37 am

The Verge
Following the US crackdown on Chinese technology companies, Google has cut off Huawei’s Android license, dealing a huge blow to the besieged phonemaker. Reuters first reported the news, and The Verge subsequently confirmed Google’s suspension of business with Huawei with a source familiar with the matter.

Reached for comment, a Google spokesperson said only “We are complying with the order and reviewing the implications.” The order, in this case, appears to be the US Commerce Department’s recent decision to place Huawei on the “Entity List,” which as Reuters reports is a list of companies that are unable to buy technology from US companies without government approval.

Speaking to Reuters, a Google spokesperson confirmed that “Google Play and the security protections from Google Play Protect will continue to function on existing Huawei devices.” So while existing Huawei phones around the world won’t be immediately impacted by the decision, the future of updates for those phones as well as any new phones Huawei would produce remains in question.

Huawei is now restricted to using the Android Open Source Project (AOSP), cutting the company off from critical Google apps and services that consumers outside of China expect on Android devices. That also means Huawei will only be able to push security updates for Android once they’re made available in AOSP, assuming the company uses its own update system. It’s not clear yet how this will affect the full range of Android integrations that Huawei depends on, but we will update this story when we receive additional clarification about the impacts of Google’s decision.
Silver - 1k

Post Reply